Urinary stress incontinence is an epidemic. But most women can be helped by strengthening their pelvic floor. Jane Burdick, a Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner®, can show you exactly how to do this—in the privacy of your own home. –Christiane Northrup, MD., and author Women’s Bodies, Women’s Wisdom (Bantam, 1998) The Wisdom of Menopause (Bantam, 2001)

Stress-Incontinence is involuntary urinary leakage from coughing, sneezing, laughing, lifting and exercising.
• It effects tens of millions of women of all ages in the United States.
• Most people don’t know that it is possible to regain control without surgery.

CD Contents Include

CD 1 (67:25)

Track 1 (1:30) This track is a short introduction about who can benefit and what tools are needed in order to begin…..ie. a hard chair, 2 thin pillows, etc.

Track 2 (39:40) Simple seated anatomy of the pelvic floor done in the imagination with the help of the drawing on the CD. Slow-motion sneeze in sitting. Enlisting the use of the entire body in order to retrain the urethra to close before and during a forceful exhale such as a sneeze, cough or laugh.

Track 3 (26:55) Slow-motion sneeze lying on the back. Another use of whole-body flexion to retrain the urethra and the whole pelvic floor. Includes use of the eyes, tongue, hands, head, breastbone, backbone…..and the easy development of long-lost stomach muscles.

CD 2 (67:25)

Track 1 (20:14) Introduction and tools needed.Connecting the feet to the pelvic floor. With the feet on the wall, lying on the back, discovering how each area of the foot influences specific areas of the pelvic floor and can lead to improvement with every step.

Track 2 (18:12) Connecting the feet to the pelvic floor in standing. Grounding through the feet to awaken, lift and tone the pelvic floor, using gravity’s counter forces to help. Breathing. Use of the inhale/exhale to help contract the pelvic floor.

Track 3 (28:25) Walking on the wall. Learning to contract the pelvic floor side to side and through the core, allowing each step to lift, tone, and transfer movement through the system, including the pelvic floor, without effort.